December 11th, 2001

cape & merc.

(no subject)

scyth·rop

skĭth-rŭp [first syllable is accented and rhymes with myth]

From the Greek σκυθρωπος meaning "of gloomy countenance" and Anglicized as a proper name by Thomas Love Peacock in his 1818 parody of the Gothic novel, Nightmare Abbey, wherein a very, very thinly-veiled charicature of Peacock's friend Percy Bysshe Shelley is presented in the person of Scythrop Glowry, scion of the venerable but dwindling Glowry family, whose seat is the titular Abbey. Scythrop spends the entirety of the book moping about dramatically, becoming lovelorn, drinking madeira from the skull of an ancestor, locking himself in a tower, and publishing his own work, Philosophical Gas, a Project for a General Illumination of the Human Mind, which sells seven copies. I identify with him enormously.
  • Current Mood
    gloomy.